Samuel Golding’s Insight Into the South Bay Clean Power Business Plan

2017-02-16_15-48-44As the primary author of the South Bay Clean Power Business Plan, Samuel Golding, of Community Choice Partners, has been consulting for our SBCP Working Group since the summer of 2016.  Here’s Samuel’s guest post on the models employed for the best practices that drive the strategic direction and planning for South Bay Clean Power’s CCA:

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

South Bay Clean Power is BIG. Two times the size of the largest CCA under implementation in Northern California. And when all of Los Angeles County goes CCA, almost one-third of Southern California Edison’s current load will be served by public power:

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One of the most important takeaways from our research, analysis and planning is that with this scale comes the responsibility to design an appropriate kind of CCA. The launch process and routine that has worked for smaller CCAs will not work for South Bay Clean Power. Our Business Plan details the design and process that will work, based on proven models and best practices.

The main issue is that South Bay Clean Power should not rely on a primary power supplier at the outset, as other CCAs have done.  Instead, the program must diversify its sources and suppliers of power — from Day 1. The CCA also need to work with Southern California Edison to make sure that the transition goes smoothly. Both parties share the responsibility to make that happen — proactively and collaboratively – because South Bay Clean Power is so large.

The ability to do all that practically means contracting for a full suite of energy risk management services – and doing so based on the proven model of capabilities that established public power entities employ. Growing these risk management capabilities incrementally over a period of years, like smaller CCAs have done, is not a viable option for South Bay Clean Power — the CCA needs to launch with those capabilities in place. Continue reading

This is Our South Bay Clean Power Business Plan

It is our very great pleasure to publicly share the South Bay Clean Power draft Business Plan, which we have delivered to:

  • Each of the 14 South Bay and Westside cities that requested to be part of the Los Angeles County CCA feasibility study.
  • All five LA County Supervisors as well as the LA County CCA team we’ve been working with since we brought Community Choice Aggregation to the County in 2015.
  • Long Beach Mayor Garcia and each of the 9 LB Council members, all of whom we have been meeting with over the last year to encourage and support their City’s CCA efforts.
  • Our International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 11 and Los Angeles chapter National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) supporters.
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 We openly publish our plan today here on our web site to make it immediately accessible and available. We believe in full transparency and in providing an open-source detailed document to any Distributed Energy Resources-focused CCA effort that shares our goals and objectives and who wishes to take advantage of the research and analysis our group has engaged in.

Combined with our draft South Bay Clean Power Joint Powers Agreement (JPA) and template Request for Proposals (RFP) for Services (forthcoming), our goal is to provide a readily accessible package for local governments and citizen advisory committees to launch large, scalable and advanced CCAs with a minimum of effort or upfront expense.

An Unrelenting Focus On Achieving Our Goals

This Business Plan was designed first and foremost to serve as the step-by-step guide and tutorial to launch a CCA with the capabilities necessary to achieve the goals and objectives created by the South Bay Clean Power Working Group that began exploring Community Choice in mid 2014:

  1. Accelerate renewable portfolio content to 100% (goal of 10 years);
  2. No use of Green-E or Category 3 unbundled Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs);
  3. Maximize the use of Distributed Energy Resources (DER), which we define as behind-the-meter renewable power generation, energy storage, energy efficiency, demand response and electric vehicles;
  4. Prioritize local investment, local power generation, local jobs and career opportunities;
  5. Support labor in advancing project labor agreements, community benefit agreements, sustainable workforce agreements, job training and apprenticeship programs;
  6. Focus on environmental justice in frontline communities (where needs are greatest).

Over the course of designing a CCA to achieve these goals, we were determined to answer the critical determining questions, including: